Tips for Driving Through Storms

When you are behind the wheel, you always have to be alert to everything around you. This means that you not only have to be aware of pedestrians and other drivers on the road, but you will also have to be prepared for the onset of inclement weather. Weather can change at the blink of an eye, without warning. When you are driving and a storm suddenly hits, there are certain things you can do to stay safe. Here are a few tips for driving through storms from an experienced Personal injury lawyer Washington DC.

Be Prepared

First and foremost, you should be prepared when you go for a drive. Check the weather forecast in your area, as well as any area to which you may be driving. You will be better able to handle whatever comes your way as a result. You may even be able to plan alternate routes to take where the weather isn’t quite as severe.

Tell someone close to you about your route, destination and the time you plan on arriving. That way, you can always get help if your car stalls or breaks down during a storm. You should also have emergency equipment on hand, such as a flashlight, first aid kit, water, snacks and prescription medication.

Slow Down

During a bad storm that involves rain, snow, hail or wind, you should always slow down while driving. The roads can be very slick when they’re wet, which means your car can skid out of control and cause an accident. Strong winds can also make it challenging to drive, and can even give your car a push if they are very severe. Hail is dangerous and can divert your attention from the road. In addition, it’s important to leave more room between your vehicle and the ones around you during a storm.

Turn on Your Headlights

Turn your headlights on any time you drive in a storm, even if it is daytime and fairly light outside. Be sure to use your regular beams, and avoid using your high beams unless you are in an area where there are no drivers nearby. It is important to use your headlights at all times during a storm because visibility is decreased considerably when there is heavy rain or snow as it collects on your windshield and rear window. With no headlights on, it may be more difficult for other drivers to see you as well.

Wait it Out, if Possible

If it is at all possible, depending on the severity of the storm, you should wait it out before continuing driving. If you feel that you cannot comfortably drive when you get caught in a particularly bad storm, pull over. However, it is essential to avoid stopping near trees or power lines, as severe storms can result in them being knocked down. You want to avoid a potential disaster, not experience one that’s even worse.

If the storm you are caught in while driving is a tornado, park your car, get out and immediately seek shelter. Remember that you can always replace a car, but not your life or the lives of your passengers.


A special thanks to our authors at Brynn Law for their insight into personal injury cases.

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