Who is the best lawyer near me?

best lawyer in memphis

You may have been hurt in an auto accident or truck accident and wondering:

 

  • Who is the best injury lawyer or best accident lawyer in Memphis, or Nashville?
  • Who is the best injury attorney near me?
  • Who is the best car wreck lawyer in Cordova, or Bartlett, or Germantown?
  • Who is the best car wreck attorney near me?

You may have been injured and Googled those questions, or perhaps others:

  • Who is the best personal injury attorney or wrongful death lawyer in Memphis?
  • Who is the best spinal cord injury lawyer, or brain injury lawyer near me, or in Memphis, or in Tennessee?
  • Who is the best lawyer to negotiate with an insurance company for damages for your injury?

Right question. Wrong answer.

You won’t ever hear any lawyer or attorney at Wiseman Bray PLLC claim that we are the “best” in Memphis – for a couple of different reasons. First, because there are plenty of fine lawyers and attorneys in the Memphis and Nashville, Tennessee area, including in Cordova, Bartlett, Germantown, Arlington, Millington, Collierville, and Lakeland.  We would seriously question any injury lawyer with the temerity to proclaim himself “the best.”

Second, based on Rule 7 of the Rules of Professional Conduct, the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility back in 2004 specifically prohibited such self-serving, subjective statements by attorneys, including statements that a lawyer is “most qualified,” “excellent,” “top,” “most experienced,” “preferred”, or an “expert” in a particular field of law, such as personal injury, auto accident, or wrongful death.  The Board’s opinion was based on provisions of Rule 7 that have since been revised, and thus it is not entirely clear whether an outright prohibition is still technically enforceable. However, most reputable lawyers still find such statements to be highly questionable, and certainly in poor taste.

So, the next time you hear an attorney refer to herself or himself as an expert, or say that he or she is the best lawyer in a Tennessee town – whether on TV or on a website or in marketing materials – you should know that that lawyer is not only humility-challenged, but also possibly in violation of the basic Rules governing attorney conduct.

The right answer?

At Wiseman Bray PLLC, you’ll only hear us talk about our experience in Memphis and Nashville, Tennessee injury claims, and about our unique and selective approach to personal injury and wrongful death claims. When it comes to injury cases, we’re not a high-volume, low-dollar settlement firm. We only take serious claims involving serious injuries or death, and we purposefully keep our caseload small so we can give our clients the attention they deserve.

Waivers and Releases Do Not Eliminate Liability for Gross Negligence: Ask the Injury Lawyer

release of liability, call injury lawyer

Tennessee Law on Contracting Away Liability

Chances are you’ve signed a Waiver or Release of Liability. Maybe you were going whitewater rafting or visited an indoor trampoline or “bouncy house” park. Businesses providing recreational activities generally require you to sign a form with lots of fine print before you can participate. These forms generally absolve the business of liability if you get hurt. Is that legal? Yes.  But there’s one thing to remember: In Tennessee, a person or business cannot contract away liability for “gross negligence.” That’s why you need to consult with a personal injury lawyer if you are injured, but someone tells you they’re not responsible because you signed a Release or Waiver.

Tennessee law allows people to enter into contracts that say that ABC will not be liable and that XYZ is “assuming the risk,” including the risk that ABC might commit negligence.  However, the law says that such a contract will not protect ABC if ABC is guilty of gross negligence. Buckner v. Varner, 793 S.W.2d 939, 941 (Tenn. Ct. App.1990).

What is Gross Negligence?

What is gross negligence and how is it different from regular negligence?  Regular negligence is the failure to use ordinary or reasonable care.  Gross negligence involves a higher degree of “bad” conduct and callous indifference to consequences. That’s why Tennessee law won’t allow people to contract away liability for gross negligence.  However, it’s harder to prove that someone committed gross negligence. You have to show:

  • The person committed ordinary negligence, and
  • The person acted “with utter unconcern for the safety of others, or … with such a reckless disregard for the rights of others that a conscious indifference to consequences is implied . . .” Leatherwood Wadley, 121 S.W.3d 682, 693–94 (Tenn. Ct. App.2003).

Consult with an Injury Lawyer

If you are injured or hurt while participating in a recreational activity, you should consult with a personal injury lawyer. Don’t automatically assume that you can’t recover because you signed a Release or Waiver. A personal injury lawyer can examine the language of any form you signed and can advise you whether you might have a claim.

Need an Injury Lawyer? We can help.

Call Wiseman Bray PLLC at (901) 372-5003 or email us here.  Visit our website to learn more about us and our work. Offices in Memphis and Nashville.