Lang Wiseman Named Vice-Chair of TSC Rules Commission

business litigation attorney memphis tnWiseman Bray PLLC is proud to announce that the Tennessee Supreme Court recently named Lang Wiseman to the prestigious position of Vice-Chair of the Advisory Commission on the Rules of Practice and Procedure.

The Advisory Commission meets periodically to study, and to advise and make recommendations to the Supreme Court, regarding the various rules of practice and procedure in the trial and appellate courts. Commission members are appointed by the Supreme Court pursuant to Tenn. Code Ann. §16-3-601.

How to Talk to Your Insurance Company After an Accident

insurance company after car accidentAfter a car accident, you may feel it necessary to contact your auto insurance company or carrier and let them know what has happened immediately. While informing your carrier of an accident is an important step in getting the compensation you deserve, there are a few things you should know before you pick up the phone.

Don’t Always Expect the Insurance Company to be on Your Side

As nice as it is to believe that an insurance company is on your side, this might not always be the case. Insurance agencies are running a business, meaning their main concern will almost always be their bottom dollar. Even though you may have paid your monthly premiums, and followed up on your end of the bargain, the insurance company will likely still not be looking after your best interests. That’s why you may want to consider enlisting the help of a personal injury attorney. Their main objective is to help you get the compensation you deserve. In fact, most DC personal injury lawyers won’t see any payment until you do.

Speaking with Your Insurance Company

After an accident, you may want to follow these steps:

  • Call the police
  • Take care of injuries
  • Exchange information with the other driver
  • Document the accident
  • Report the accident to your insurance company

When you contact the insurance company, you will likely need the following information:

  • Policy information
  • Identity Verification
  • Facts about the accident
  • What property was damaged
  • If there were any injuries
  • Police report and its identification number

At this point, insurance companies will likely try and find ways to reject your accident claims or find a way to pay the least amount of money on a claim. Remember, you only have to provide the basic information at this time. Stick to the facts and avoid adding any personal opinions, or conjecture about liability; an insurance company will likely try to spin any non-factual evidence you provide to avoid paying your claim. This is also not a time to accept any offers from the insurance company for a payout. If you already have an attorney, provide the attorney’s contact information to the representative. If you don’t have an attorney, let the representative know you will be getting one. Retaining an attorney shows the insurance company that you are serious and that they cannot take advantage of you.

If you’ve been injured in an accident and are in the process of dealing with your insurance company to get the compensation you deserve, it may be in your best interest to seek the help of an experienced personal injury lawyer.

0 COHEN

 

Thanks to our friends and co-contributors from Cohen & Cohen, P.C. for their added insight into communicating with your insurance agency.

 

Need a Memphis Personal Injury Lawyer?

Call us at (901) 372-5003.  Our experienced Memphis injury lawyers can help you make the most of your insurance claim. Sign up for email notifications of blog posts here.

WISEMAN BRAY PLLC

8001 Centerview Parkway, Suite 103

Memphis, Tennessee 38018

(901) 372-5003 Office

(901) 383-6599 Fax

www.WisemanBray.com

Wrongful Death of a Child

wrongful death of a child attorneyNo one should have to ever think about the wrongful death of a child. As a mother of two young children, I can’t think of anything more unbearable than the loss of a child. But according to the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, over 57,000 children under the age of 19 die every year in the United States.

Our law firm represents parents who have lost a child due to the fault of another person or company. The legal term for a death caused by someone else’s negligence or wrongdoing is “wrongful death.”

Who can File Suit for Wrongful Death of a Child?

In Tennessee, only certain people have the right to file a lawsuit to recover damages for the wrongful death of a child. As a general matter, the child’s parents can file suit against the responsible party.  If the parents are divorced, special rules apply. Usually, the parent with “primary custody” has the right to file suit. An administrator can also file the lawsuit. Tenn. Code Ann. Section Tennessee Code Annotated Section 20-5-106 provides that the wrongful death cause of action:

shall pass to . . .the [child’s] natural parents or parent or next of kin if at the time of death [the child] was in the custody of the natural parents or parent and had not been legally surrendered or abandoned by [the parents] pursuant to any court order removing [the child] from the custody of [the parents or parent]; or otherwise to the [child’s] legally adoptive parents or parent, or to the administrator for the use and benefit of the adoptive parents or parent; the funds recovered in either case to be free from the claims of creditors.

Occasionally, due to family circumstances, wrongful death cases involving children can become very complicated. Sometimes disputes arise between divorced parents or among family members as to how the case should be handled. Also, even if you aren’t the person to file the lawsuit, you may still be entitled to recover a portion of the damages awarded. Likewise, the person who files the lawsuit may or may not be entitled to a portion of the money damages awarded. An experienced wrongful death attorney can talk with you, learn about your family situation, and advise you on your potential rights.

What are the Damages in a Wrongful Death Case Involving a Child?

Damages in a case involving the wrongful death of a child are determined on a case by case basis. A jury will look at all of the facts and circumstances and make an award. Legally speaking though, the types of damages recoverable in a wrongful death case are statutory and are set forth in Tennessee Code Annotated Section 20-5-113. The general categories are:

(1)     Injuries Suffered by the Child from Time of Injury Until Death

This classification allows recovery for medical expenses, physical and mental pain and suffering, funeral expenses, and loss of earning capacity during the period from injury to death.

(2)     Incidental Damages Sustained by Child’s Next of Kin

This classification of damages includes the pecuniary value of the child’s life.  The “pecuniary value” of a deceased child’s life represents the value of the child’s probable future financial accumulations at the time of the child’s death.  To determine the pecuniary value of a decedent’s life, a court considers the following factors: life expectancy and age, condition of health, capacity for earning money through a skill, art, trade, profession, occupation or business, and personal habits regarding sobriety and industry. The amount should then be reduced by deducting the decedent’s probable living expenses had the decedent lived.

In the case of a wrongful death of a child, the analysis is a bit different. Living expenses are the costs associated with child-rearing. In the case of a very young child, estimates of the child’s future earnings and contributions are speculative at best. For this reason, it can be helpful to have expert testimony concerning the valuation of a child’s pecuniary losses.

Loss of Consortium (Filial Consortium Damages)

Pecuniary value also includes the value of human companionship. Parents of a deceased child are entitled to recover for loss of consortium.  However, these claims for loss of consortium cannot exist independently from the claim that a defendant’s negligence caused the child’s death. Thus, parents cannot recover for the sorrow and anguish endured as a result of the child’s death. Rather, the “pecuniary value” of the child’s life includes a value for the parents’ loss of consortium

In determining the amount of consortium damages, courts consider the benefits the child bestowed on the family, such as companionship, comfort, society, attention, cooperation, affection, care and love. Because it is impossible to generalize on the extent to which family members enjoy each other’s companionship and society, the measurement of a particular parent’s loss of a particular child’s consortium is decided on a case by case basis.

Punitive Damages

If the child’s death was caused by reckless or intentional conduct, parents can seek punitive damages. Punitive damages are designed to punish the responsible person and deter similar behavior.

Negligent Infliction of Emotional Distress

Depending on the facts of the case, parents of a deceased child may be able to assert independent claims for “negligent infliction of emotional distress.” An experienced wrongful death lawyer can advise you further about this and other claims you may have.

Limits on Damages in Tennessee Due to Tort Reform

As a general rule, the most that parents can recover for “loss of consortium” damages for the wrongful death of a child is $750,000. Punitive damages are usually limited to $500,000 or two times the compensatory damages, whichever is greater. One of our Memphis wrongful death attorneys can discuss your case and explain the rules on damages in Tennessee, as well as the various limitations in effect due to Tennessee Tort Reform.

Looking for a Caring and Compassionate Wrongful Death Lawyer?

If you’d like to speak with a caring and compassionate wrongful death lawyer in the Memphis or Nashville area, please call our office at 901-372-5003. We’re not your everyday law firm. We are mothers and fathers just like you and we treat our clients like family. There is never any charge for an initial consultation or meeting.  To get email notifications of our blog posts, please sign up here.

Resources for Families Suffering the Wrongful Death of a Child

Understanding Grief When Your Child Dies

The Death of a Child: The Grief of the Parents: A Lifetime Journey

 

Blog Post by:   Erin Shea

memphis personal injury lawyer and wrongful death attorneyErin practices in the area of civil litigation, including personal injury and wrongful death, premises liability, apartment crime, business and contractual disputes, and insurance claims. Before joining Wiseman Bray PLLC, Erin practiced at Rainey, Kizer, Reviere & Bell PLC, gaining extensive experience in litigation. Her experience at a large insurance defense firm gives her a unique perspective in advancing claims on behalf of the firm’s clients.

Erin has been listed as a Mid-South Super Lawyers Rising Star every year since 2009  and is a Fellow of the Memphis Bar Foundation.

She is married to Martin F. Shea, Jr., and has two very active young children— Elin (Age 4) and Martin (Age 21 months)– and a German Shepherd dog named Iko.  In her spare time, she enjoys reading, movies, good television, and exercise.

 

 

Erin Melton Shea

WISEMAN BRAY PLLC

8001 Centerview Parkway, Suite 103

Memphis, Tennessee 38018

(901) 372-5003

 

Could an Independent Presidential Candidate Throw the Election to the House of Representatives?

could an independent presidential candidate win the White HouseBy: Lang Wiseman

Let’s talk potential Independent Presidential Candidate, Electoral College, and throwing the election into the House of Representatives.

The short answer?  Even assuming the election gets thrown into the House, only persons who actually receive a vote in the Electoral College would be eligible for consideration by the House.

[Go “Like” Wiseman Bray PLLC on Facebook and “Follow” Wiseman Bray PLLC on Twitter for more free legal tips, news & updates.]

An Independent Candidate?

Many voters and commentators dislike both Clinton and Trump, and are actively seeking an independent candidate or candidates.  For example, last week a leading member of the #NeverTrump movement (Bill Kristol) suggested that David French, a good friend of mine from law school, would be his choice to run as an independent candidate. David is a great guy – smart, principled, patriotic, and down to earth.  And while you wouldn’t necessarily know it from looking at him or reading his work, he loves basketball and actually had a pretty good jumpshot back in law school.  Ultimately, though, David decided not to run.

The path to victory for an independent candidate would be extremely narrow, and shrinking every day, if not already closed as a practical matter.  The various windows for submitting petitions to qualify to appear on state ballots are closing rapidly, leading most of the Anti-Clinton/Trump forces to freely acknowledge that an independent presidential candidate would have little chance to win an election outright.

So what, then, could possibly be the goal?  At least one stated aim is to try to prevent either candidate from securing a majority of Electoral College votes, thus throwing the election into the House of Representatives where a “white knight” candidate could be selected for President.

But is it realistic to think Clinton and Trump could both be prevented from getting a majority of votes in the Electoral College? 

There are 538 total electoral votes, and 270 constitutes a majority.  While it is theoretically possible to have a 269-269 tie – indeed, there are 32 different tie scenarios if you assume 11 battleground states – it is highly unlikely.  Realistically, then, an independent presidential candidate would need to win at least one state in order to prevent both Clinton and Trump from getting to a 270 vote majority in the Electoral College.  However, that is more difficult than you might think.  In 1992, for example, Ross Perot garnered 19% of the vote nationally, but didn’t secure a single Electoral College vote because he failed to actually win a state.  Thus, without major funding or campaign infrastructure, an  independent candidate would likely need to focus almost exclusively on a small handful of states, and then hope for the best in the House of Representatives.

constitutional law memphis

But let’s assume that happens.  What’s next in the House?

The Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution spells out the process, and it actually works quite a bit differently than many voters and commentators apparently believe it does.  This has occurred only twice in history – the election of Thomas Jefferson in 1800 and Andrew Jackson in 1824.

First, the House doesn’t vote in a normal fashion where every representative gets to cast his/her separate vote.  The voting takes place by state, with each state getting one vote.  So a state with a majority of Democrat representatives would presumably vote one way, whereas a state with a majority of Republican representatives would presumably vote another way.  This possibly dilutes a Party’s voting strength.  Assume, for example, 3 states that each have 20 representatives.  States 1 and 2 each have 11 Democrats vs. 9 Republicans, compared to State 3 which has 20 Republicans and 0 Democrats.  If you totaled all those votes separately, then the vote of the Republican representatives would win easily: 38-22.  However, in state-by-state voting, the Democrats would lead 2-1.

Second, and perhaps more importantly, the Twelfth Amendment specifically prohibits a true “white knight” outsider scenario, because the House can only vote for a candidate who finishes in the top 3 in the Electoral College votes.  The pertinent part of the Twelfth Amendment states as follows:

“If no person have a majority [in the Electoral College], then from the persons having the highest numbers not exceeding three on the list of those voted for president, the House of Representatives shall choose immediately, by ballot, the president.”

Thus, a “white knight” candidate must have received at least 1 electoral vote in order to be eligible for consideration by the House.  That presumably means no Paul Ryan, no Bernie Sanders, no Mitt Romney, nor any other outsider who failed to participate in the general election process and win at least one state (or portion thereof, since 2 states — Nebraska and Maine — are technically not winner-take-all when it comes to their 3 electoral votes each).

election law lang wiseman

The Faithless Elector — the Last Possible Hail Mary?

The Electoral College technically meets and votes in December following the November election.  Based on the Twelfth Amendment, the only other way to trigger a “white knight” scenario would be for one or more of the electors to disregard the popular vote in his/her particular state and become what is referred to as a “Faithless elector” by casting his/her ballot for an outsider.   Twenty-nine states have laws or political party restrictions that technically require an Elector to conform his/her vote to the popular vote in the state; however, no one has ever actually been prosecuted for becoming a Faithless Elector.  Twenty-one states have no laws at all to require Electors to vote for a pledged candidate.

Barring a situation where an independent candidate actually won an electoral vote, the Anti-Clinton/Trump forces would be hoping for an election night that produced a tie in the Electoral College vote.  They would then hope to peel off one or more Faithless electors to cast votes for a “white knight” candidate in December, thus making him/her eligible for a miracle in the House of Representatives.

election law attorney in memphis

About Lang Wiseman: Lang is the former Chairman of the Shelby County Republican Party and attended the 2012 Republican National Convention.

Lang has substantial experience in the areas of business and commercial litigation; bank litigation and workouts; advising small and closely held businesses; insurance coverage disputes; personal injury; professional, medical and legal malpractice; wrongful death; construction litigation and lien disputes; election law; and government relations/public policy. Lang is also a Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 31 Listed Civil Mediator.

Prior to founding Wiseman Bray PLLC, Lang served as Counsel to the United  States  Senate Governmental Affairs Committee. He previously served as Law Clerk to Judge Harry Wellford of the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals.  Lang graduated with honors from the Harvard Law School after attending the University of Tennessee on a basketball scholarship, where he finished as the 24th leading scorer in UT history (1,156 points). He also graduated with a perfect 4.0 GPA and was the Top Graduate in the College of Business.

Justice Antonin Scalia: Quotes from Lang Wiseman and Erin Shea

scalia wiseman bray lang wiseman erin shea

Justice Scalia, Photo by: University of Memphis

No doubt your news feed is filled with posts about the passing of United States Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, like this and this. We at Wiseman Bray, PLLC are saddened by the loss of Justice Scalia.

“I was fortunate enough to have the opportunity to see and hear Scalia in person a few times, the first time being when I looked up and saw him sitting in the back row of one my classes at Harvard Law.  He was an absolutely brilliant scholar.  Whether you shared his views or not, he was able to articulate his thoughts in a manner that made him one of the most transformational legal figures of the last century.  He was the rock star of the conservative legal movement, and yet so charming and genteel that even those who disagreed with him couldn’t help but appreciate his intellect.”   Lang Wiseman

“I had the pleasure of hearing Justice Scalia speak at a luncheon in Memphis in 2013. I specifically remember being in awe of his wisdom in discussing the Constitution and the practice of law.  It’s not every day that you are exposed to people like him, and that is a day I will always remember.”    Erin Shea

 

Wiseman Bray PLLC

8001 Centerview Parkway, Suite 103

Memphis, TN  38018

(901) 372-5003

 

Politics in the Workplace: Wiseman Quoted in Memphis Daily News

Let’s talk politics. Or not. Regardless of the outcome, the 2016 Presidential Election is set to go down in history.  You have probably learned about (or are inundated with!) the political positions of many of your friends through social media accounts like Facebook and Twitter.

But what about politics in the workplace?

In 2012, Reporter Andy Meek wrote an insightful article for the Memphis Daily News about the need for employers to carefully monitor the discussion of politics in the workplace. It’s worth pointing out again during this election cycle. Attorney Lang Wiseman was interviewed for the article, which stated in part:

Lang Wiseman, a partner at Wiseman Bray PLLC, said there’s an even bigger worry than that.

“Politics can be a passionate topic that can lead to heated – if not disruptive – incidents and feelings,” he said. “In fact, political discussion can at times even become infused with notions of religion, race and sex that can create actual legal risks for the employers. That’s not to say that every perceived slight or discomfort in the workplace gives rise to a legal cause of action, but just to note that there is a careful balancing act that employers have to stay on top of.”

READ THE ARTICLE: Attorneys Warn Against Workplace Political Talk

politics in the workplace attorney

 

 

 

 

 

WISEMAN BRAY PLLC

8001 Centerview Parkway, Suite 103

Memphis, Tennessee 38018

(901) 372-5003 Office

www.WisemanBray.com

The Attorneys of Wiseman Bray PLLC handle personal injury cases, auto accidents, apartment crime cases, estate planning, asset protection, charitable planning, business litigation, business organization, business counseling, and many other general legal services.  Please visit our website to learn more about our attorneys and the work we do for our clients.