Trick-or-Treating Safety Tips from Wiseman Bray

personal injury lawyer memphis tn

Halloween is such a fun time of year, especially for children.   Sadly, it is also a very dangerous night for kids.  On average, twice as many child pedestrians are killed while walking on Halloween compared to other days of the year.  Only 18% of parents use reflective tape on their children’s Halloween costumes, and 12% of children ages 5 or younger are permitted to trick-or-treat alone!  In addition to talking with your kids about Halloween safety, here are some things you can do for a safer night:

 

  • Kids under 12 should trick-or-treat and cross streets with an adult.
  • Use reflective tape on costumes.
  • Walk on sidewalks and paths, and not in the street.
  • If there are no sidewalks, you should walk facing traffic as far to the side as possible.
  • Cross streets at corners only, using traffic signals and crosswalks.
  • Watch for cars that are turning around or backing up.

DRIVERS: If you are driving on Halloween night, be especially vigilant!  Slow down, even more than usual, in residential neighborhoods. Children are excited on Halloween and often move in unpredictable ways.

HOMEOWNERS. If you are a homeowner, here are some ways you can help keep trick-or-treaters safe:

  • Keep Property Well-Lit– Kids will be cutting through all parts of your yard to find your front door, so make sure that your property is well-lit and that it is obvious which door trick-or-treaters should go to.
  • Keep Property Unobstructed– Clean up yard debris, fill gopher holes, wind up hoses, and pick up toys or other equipment left in the yard.
  • Restrain Pets– Be sure to keep your pets away from the front door and porch, where they might get excited and jump on or bite trick-or-treaters. It is best to keep your pet in another room or in the garage during trick-or-treating time.

The attorneys and staff of Wiseman Bray PLLC wish you a very Happy and Safe Halloween!

erin shea injury lawyer memphis tn

Erin Shea, Attorney

Tow Truck Driver Shot at Eden at Watersedge Apartments and Townhomes in Memphis, TN

apartment crime lawyer memphis tnCrime at Memphis apartment complexes continues.

Just this morning, a tow truck driver was shot in the head through the window of his truck at the Eden at Watersedge Apartments and Townhomes near Fox Meadows on South Mendenhall Road. According to the news we’re reading, witnesses heard four gunshots ring out before calling 911. When police arrived, they found the driver inside of the tow truck unconscious. Officers had to break out a window of the truck to get inside. According to WMC Action News 5 in Memphis, the victim was identified as 28-year-old Darrell Adams and he was checking for parking violations at the apartment complex when he was shot.

Does the Victim (Tow Truck Driver, Darrell Adams) have a claim against the apartment complex where he got shot?

Maybe. There are many factors to consider. In Tennessee, apartment complex owners and managers must take reasonable measures to protect tenants and guests from foreseeable criminal attacks. Whether Mr. Adams would be able to recover against the Edens at Watersedge depends on a number of factors, including, but not limited to, the facts of how the incident occurred, security measures provided at the apartment complex, and crime levels for the apartment complex and surrounding neighborhood.

Are you the victim of an apartment crime or apartment shooting? If so, call the apartment crime lawyer Memphis,TN knows and respects.

If you are the victim of a serious injury due to apartment crime, please call Wiseman Bray PLLC today at 901-372-5003. We’ve helped other crime victims like you, and we can help YOU recover your damages if apartment management failed to take reasonable measures to protect against foreseeable criminal attacks. Wiseman Bray PLLC is an apartment crime lawyer Memphis, TN  knows and trusts. We will meet or speak with you and discuss whether you might have a case at no charge.  Call us today.

WISEMAN BRAY PLLC

8001 Centerview Parkway, Suite 103

Memphis, Tennessee 38018

(901) 372-5003

www.WisemanBray.com

Lang Wiseman Named Vice-Chair of TSC Rules Commission

business litigation attorney memphis tnWiseman Bray PLLC is proud to announce that the Tennessee Supreme Court recently named Lang Wiseman to the prestigious position of Vice-Chair of the Advisory Commission on the Rules of Practice and Procedure.

The Advisory Commission meets periodically to study, and to advise and make recommendations to the Supreme Court, regarding the various rules of practice and procedure in the trial and appellate courts. Commission members are appointed by the Supreme Court pursuant to Tenn. Code Ann. §16-3-601.

Top 10 Social Media Tips for Personal Injury Victims From Personal Injury Lawyer Memphis, TN Counts On!

memphis personal injury lawyerIt seems that everyone is on Facebook or some other type of social media these days. Many people are even addicted to it. If you have a Memphis, TN car wreck or personal injury claim, you should carefully consider the impact your social media posts could have on your case and the ultimate settlement or verdict you receive.  As an experienced personal injury lawyer Memphis TN knows and trusts, I can tell you that insurance companies and defense attorneys, as part of their evaluation of you and your case, perform social media account investigation. They will pull up your Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and other social media accounts to see if they can gather useful information about you, your activities, and the extent of your injuries.  We at Wiseman Bray PLLC put together the following social media tips for personal injury victims.

Personal Injury Social Media Tips

  1. Archive the content of current accounts. Destruction of potential evidence may create bigger problems than the information itself, so it is important that you do not delete any current content on your social media accounts.  Most social media sites include directions for archiving.

 

  1. Ideally, stop active use of social media. Consider stopping active use of social media altogether. Use it purely for passively looking at content posted by others, and do not post content of your own.

 

  1. At a minimum, be cautious. If you must post information about yourself, think about how posts might be perceived, especially when taken out of context. For example, posting photos of you on a camping trip may leave the false impression that you participate in vigorous physical activity without difficulty or pain.  Social media almost never provides a complete and accurate depiction of life since most people tend to post only the most positive or glamorous aspects of their lives.  You must assume that anything you post – including status updates, messages, and wall postings – will at some point be seen by the other lawyers, judges, and juries. NEVER post information that may relate to your injury claim, even indirectly.

 

  1. Disclose potential problems to a personal injury lawyer Memphis TN counts on. You may have already made potentially problematic posts before reading this. Remember, though, that you should not destroy or delete any information from your social media accounts.  However, do let your personal injury lawyer know so that he or she can avoid any surprises down the road.

 

  1. Turn on the highest privacy settings. Set your privacy settings to the highest level.  Make sure that only friends can see your information, rather than friends of friends, or the general public.

 

  1. Be aware of “friends.” Create “friend lists” so that only certain friends can see your photo albums or status updates.  Remove any “friends” you do not know well, or at all, and accept friend requests and followers only from people you know and trust.  

 

  1. Make yourself invisible to searches. As learned by a personal injury lawyer Memphis TN knows and relies on, you can remove yourself from Facebook search results by selecting “only friends” under the “search visibility” option in your profile settings.  You can also remove yourself from Google in Memphis TN by unchecking the box for “Public Search Listing” in your Internet Privacy settings. You should make comparable changes to privacy settings on all other social media accounts.

 

  1. Preserve all computers, tablets, and cell phones. If you lose or destroy an electronic communication device, the lawyer on the other side could try to portray it as deliberate destruction of evidence.  It is better to fight a battle over access to a device than to have a judge instruct a jury that it may legally assume and conclude the contents of the device would have been unfavorable to you.

 

  1. Don’t send messages or information about your case. Do not send to anyone, except for your lawyers and their staff, any email, text message, or “private” social media message about your claim, health, or activities. Those communications are not privileged and opposing counsel may be allowed to review any and all such communications.  Careless communication can destroy a case.

 

  1. Don’t join websites or web chat groups. You do not own the information you post online, and that information is highly searchable.  Do not enter any information on dating or insurance sites, post on message boards, participate in or comment on social media “private” groups or blogs, or use chat rooms.

Social Media in Other Types of Cases and Claims

These tips are useful if you are involved in any type of litigation or claim, such as apartment crime, negligent security, insurance claim, contract disputes, business litigation, car or auto accident, or premises liability.

Need a personal injury lawyer Memphis TN trusts?

Call us at Wiseman Bray PLLC  today at (901) 372-5003 or email us here.  Let us put our experience as negotiators, litigators, and trial lawyers to work for you.

2 Dead in Apartment Shooting at Wingood Manor Apartments in Memphis

apartment shooting at wingood memphis crime victim lawyerWell, it happened AGAIN.  There was an apartment shooting at Wingood Manor Apartments this past weekend.

According to news reports, yet another apartment shooting occurred in Memphis over the weekend that left 2 young fathers dead: Irving Guy and Joshua Irby.

Of course, not all crime can be prevented, and not all crime that occurs at an apartment complex is the fault of the property owner.  However, we represent crime victims and their families, and in prosecuting civil cases against apartment complexes for wrongful death and money damages, we often find that large, out of town owners fail to employ reasonable security measures that could have prevented innocent people from becoming victims of violent crime.

 Read about one of our recent Memphis Apartment Shooting cases here.

  • If you or someone you know has been injured or killed at an apartment complex in Memphis, call Wiseman Bray PLLC for help at (901) 372-5003. We are lawyers for apartment crime victims and their families.
  • Visit our page on Apartment Crime Law.  Sign up for our blog posts here.

 

WISEMAN BRAY PLLC

8001 Centerview Parkway, Suite 103

Memphis, Tennessee 38018

(901) 372-5003 Office

www.WisemanBray.com

 

 

Top 8 Things to Know About Tennessee Residential Property Disclosure Law

property disclosure lawyer in memphis tennesseeIf you are thinking of buying or selling a home, you may have questions about the basics on Tennessee property disclosure law. The Tennessee Residential Property Disclosure Act, Tenn. Code Ann. 66-5-201, et. seq., requires the Seller of a home to provide the Buyer with a Property Disclosure Statement.  Despite this law, there is still a large amount of civil litigation arising from defects discovered in a home after the Buyer has moved in. Be aware of these top things to know about Tennessee real estate property disclosure law:

Tennessee Property Disclosure Law

  1. Sellers are required to disclose the condition of the home, including any “material defects.” What does “material” mean? Generally, any fact or condition that might affect a Buyer’s decision to purchase the home.
  2. Sellers are only required to disclose based on the information they have.  Sellers are not required to have a home inspection, hire experts, or conduct an independent investigation to discover everything that might be wrong with their home.
  3. The Disclosure Statement is not a warranty. The disclosure form is not a substitute for a thorough home inspection.  If you are the Buyer, you shouldn’t just rely on the disclosure form. Hire your own home inspector.
  4. Some sellers are exempt from making disclosures. Common exceptions include sales or transfers between co-owners, new construction, purchases from lenders after foreclosure, auction sales, or if the Seller has not lived in the home within the 3 years before the Closing.
  5. Sellers are NOT Required to Repair Items listed in the Disclosure.  If you are the Buyer, be aware that Sellers don’t have to fix anything listed as broken or defective. If you want an item repaired, you must contract for it. In other words, both Buyer and Seller must agree in the final contract that an item will be repaired by the Seller before closing.
  6. Sellers ARE required to update their disclosures before closing. Sellers must update to address any material changes that have taken place since the original date of disclosure, or to confirm to the buyer that the original form is still accurate. Tenn. Code. Ann. 66-5-205.  If you are the Buyer, you should not close on a home without seeing an updated Disclosure Form signed and dated by the Seller.
  7. Representations in the Disclosure Form are those of the Seller only, and not the Real Estate Agents.  The Disclosure Act applies only to Sellers.  An agent can’t be sued under the Disclosure Act for information contained in a Seller’s disclosure form unless the agent is a signatory. Tenn. Code. Ann. 66-5-202; 66-5-208. However, real estate agents have certain disclosure duties pursuant to the Tennessee Real Estate Broker License Act of 1973.   Under the Real Estate Broker License Act, a real estate agent is required to “[d]isclose to each party to the transaction any “adverse facts” of which the licensee has actual notice or knowledge.”  Tenn. Code Ann. § 62-13-403.  What are adverse facts? Both Acts define adverse facts as conditions or occurrences generally recognized by competent agents that significantly reduce the structural integrity of improvements to real property or present a significant health risk to occupants of the property. Tenn. Code Ann. § 62–13–102(2); § 66–5–206. However, the definition of adverse facts found in the Real Estate Broker License Act also contains a third prong, for conditions or occurrences that “have negative impact on the value of the real estate.” Tenn. Code Ann. §62-13-102(2). See Ledbetter v. Schacht, 395 S.W.3d 130, 136 (Tenn. Ct. App. 2012).
  8. Any lawsuit against a Seller for a misrepresentation in a Disclosure Statement must be filed within one (1) year.  Any cause of action based directly on the disclosure law statutes will be lost if not filed within one (1) year from the date the buyer received the disclosure statement or the date of closing, or occupancy, whichever occurs first. Tenn. Code Ann. § 66-5-208.

Discovered a problem after closing?

If there is “trouble in paradise” with your new home and you think the Seller or a Real Estate Agent made a misrepresentation concerning the home, speak with an attorney as soon as possible.

While a lawsuit is not always necessary to resolve a legal issue, remember there are deadlines within which to file a lawsuit, if necessary.  An experienced litigation attorney can advise you of your options based on the particular facts of your situation.

Want to speak with an Attorney?

The attorneys at Wiseman Bray PLLC are experienced litigation and contract lawyers. We understand real estate transactions and sales, and we know the disclosure laws applying to both home sellers and real estate agents and brokers in Tennessee.  Call us today at (901) 372-5003.

Additional RESOURCES:

Read more about Lawsuit Deadlines: How Long Do I have to File a Lawsuit in Tennessee?

Wrongful Death of a Child

wrongful death of a child attorneyNo one should have to ever think about the wrongful death of a child. As a mother of two young children, I can’t think of anything more unbearable than the loss of a child. But according to the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, over 57,000 children under the age of 19 die every year in the United States.

Our law firm represents parents who have lost a child due to the fault of another person or company. The legal term for a death caused by someone else’s negligence or wrongdoing is “wrongful death.”

Who can File Suit for Wrongful Death of a Child?

In Tennessee, only certain people have the right to file a lawsuit to recover damages for the wrongful death of a child. As a general matter, the child’s parents can file suit against the responsible party.  If the parents are divorced, special rules apply. Usually, the parent with “primary custody” has the right to file suit. An administrator can also file the lawsuit. Tenn. Code Ann. Section Tennessee Code Annotated Section 20-5-106 provides that the wrongful death cause of action:

shall pass to . . .the [child’s] natural parents or parent or next of kin if at the time of death [the child] was in the custody of the natural parents or parent and had not been legally surrendered or abandoned by [the parents] pursuant to any court order removing [the child] from the custody of [the parents or parent]; or otherwise to the [child’s] legally adoptive parents or parent, or to the administrator for the use and benefit of the adoptive parents or parent; the funds recovered in either case to be free from the claims of creditors.

Occasionally, due to family circumstances, wrongful death cases involving children can become very complicated. Sometimes disputes arise between divorced parents or among family members as to how the case should be handled. Also, even if you aren’t the person to file the lawsuit, you may still be entitled to recover a portion of the damages awarded. Likewise, the person who files the lawsuit may or may not be entitled to a portion of the money damages awarded. An experienced wrongful death attorney can talk with you, learn about your family situation, and advise you on your potential rights.

What are the Damages in a Wrongful Death Case Involving a Child?

Damages in a case involving the wrongful death of a child are determined on a case by case basis. A jury will look at all of the facts and circumstances and make an award. Legally speaking though, the types of damages recoverable in a wrongful death case are statutory and are set forth in Tennessee Code Annotated Section 20-5-113. The general categories are:

(1)     Injuries Suffered by the Child from Time of Injury Until Death

This classification allows recovery for medical expenses, physical and mental pain and suffering, funeral expenses, and loss of earning capacity during the period from injury to death.

(2)     Incidental Damages Sustained by Child’s Next of Kin

This classification of damages includes the pecuniary value of the child’s life.  The “pecuniary value” of a deceased child’s life represents the value of the child’s probable future financial accumulations at the time of the child’s death.  To determine the pecuniary value of a decedent’s life, a court considers the following factors: life expectancy and age, condition of health, capacity for earning money through a skill, art, trade, profession, occupation or business, and personal habits regarding sobriety and industry. The amount should then be reduced by deducting the decedent’s probable living expenses had the decedent lived.

In the case of a wrongful death of a child, the analysis is a bit different. Living expenses are the costs associated with child-rearing. In the case of a very young child, estimates of the child’s future earnings and contributions are speculative at best. For this reason, it can be helpful to have expert testimony concerning the valuation of a child’s pecuniary losses.

Loss of Consortium (Filial Consortium Damages)

Pecuniary value also includes the value of human companionship. Parents of a deceased child are entitled to recover for loss of consortium.  However, these claims for loss of consortium cannot exist independently from the claim that a defendant’s negligence caused the child’s death. Thus, parents cannot recover for the sorrow and anguish endured as a result of the child’s death. Rather, the “pecuniary value” of the child’s life includes a value for the parents’ loss of consortium

In determining the amount of consortium damages, courts consider the benefits the child bestowed on the family, such as companionship, comfort, society, attention, cooperation, affection, care and love. Because it is impossible to generalize on the extent to which family members enjoy each other’s companionship and society, the measurement of a particular parent’s loss of a particular child’s consortium is decided on a case by case basis.

Punitive Damages

If the child’s death was caused by reckless or intentional conduct, parents can seek punitive damages. Punitive damages are designed to punish the responsible person and deter similar behavior.

Negligent Infliction of Emotional Distress

Depending on the facts of the case, parents of a deceased child may be able to assert independent claims for “negligent infliction of emotional distress.” An experienced wrongful death lawyer can advise you further about this and other claims you may have.

Limits on Damages in Tennessee Due to Tort Reform

As a general rule, the most that parents can recover for “loss of consortium” damages for the wrongful death of a child is $750,000. Punitive damages are usually limited to $500,000 or two times the compensatory damages, whichever is greater. One of our Memphis wrongful death attorneys can discuss your case and explain the rules on damages in Tennessee, as well as the various limitations in effect due to Tennessee Tort Reform.

Looking for a Caring and Compassionate Wrongful Death Lawyer?

If you’d like to speak with a caring and compassionate wrongful death lawyer in the Memphis or Nashville area, please call our office at 901-372-5003. We’re not your everyday law firm. We are mothers and fathers just like you and we treat our clients like family. There is never any charge for an initial consultation or meeting.  To get email notifications of our blog posts, please sign up here.

Resources for Families Suffering the Wrongful Death of a Child

Understanding Grief When Your Child Dies

The Death of a Child: The Grief of the Parents: A Lifetime Journey

 

Blog Post by:   Erin Shea

memphis personal injury lawyer and wrongful death attorneyErin practices in the area of civil litigation, including personal injury and wrongful death, premises liability, apartment crime, business and contractual disputes, and insurance claims. Before joining Wiseman Bray PLLC, Erin practiced at Rainey, Kizer, Reviere & Bell PLC, gaining extensive experience in litigation. Her experience at a large insurance defense firm gives her a unique perspective in advancing claims on behalf of the firm’s clients.

Erin has been listed as a Mid-South Super Lawyers Rising Star every year since 2009  and is a Fellow of the Memphis Bar Foundation.

She is married to Martin F. Shea, Jr., and has two very active young children— Elin (Age 4) and Martin (Age 21 months)– and a German Shepherd dog named Iko.  In her spare time, she enjoys reading, movies, good television, and exercise.

 

 

Erin Melton Shea

WISEMAN BRAY PLLC

8001 Centerview Parkway, Suite 103

Memphis, Tennessee 38018

(901) 372-5003

 

Will I have to pay taxes on my settlement?

personal injury settlementMany of our Memphis and Tennessee injury clients ask – will I have to pay taxes on my settlement for personal injuries?  The general answer is NO.

Will the IRS make me pay taxes on my settlement?

Here is what the IRS currently says about Settlements and Taxability:

If you receive a settlement for personal physical injuries or physical sickness and did not take an itemized deduction for medical expenses related to the injury or sickness in prior years, the full amount is non-taxable. Do not include the settlement proceeds in your income.

What if I did take an itemized deduction for related medical bills in prior years?

Will I have to pay taxes on my settlement if I did?  You must include in income the part of the settlement that is for medical expenses you deducted in any prior year to the extent the deduction provided a tax benefit. For detailed information on how to report this, we recommend that you speak with your accountant or tax professional.

What about settlements for Emotional Distress or Mental Anguish?

If you receive a settlement for emotional distress or mental anguish stemming from a personal physical injury or sickness, then the settlement is treated the same as a personal injury, as noted above above. However, if the settlement for emotional distress or anguish does not arise out of a personal injury or sickness, then you must include the proceeds in your income. Here is what the IRS states on this issue:

If the proceeds you receive for emotional distress or mental anguish do not originate from a personal physical injury or physical sickness, you must include them in your income. However, the amount you must include is reduced by: (1) amounts paid for medical expenses attributable to emotional distress or mental anguish not previously deducted and (2) previously deducted medical expenses for such distress and anguish that did not provide a tax benefit. Attach to your return a statement showing the entire settlement amount less related medical costs not previously deducted and medical costs deducted for which there was no tax benefit. The net taxable amount should be reported as “Other Income.”

Punitive Damages are Taxable

If you receive an actual court award of punitive damages, those proceeds are taxable and should be reported as “Other Income.”  This is true even if the award stems from personal injury or sickness.

Recovery of Lost Wages is Taxable

If your personal injury settlement is itemized to include recovery for lost wages, then that portion of the settlement is taxable and should be reported as income.  During the negotiation phase, most attorneys are careful to clarify and/or minimize, if not eliminate, any apportionment of the settlement to wages.  You would likely also receive a Form 1099 for any recovery attributable to lost wages.  [Note: Wages and/or settlements paid in connection with work comp are not taxable.]

Interest on a Settlement is Taxable

What if the other side doesn’t pay my settlement all at once? Will I have to pay taxes on my settlement if they pay me interest? Yes. Interest you are paid on any settlement is taxable as “Interest Income.”

Do I have to tell my CPA or Tax Preparer about my settlement?

We advise that you do, so that he or she can advise you on the most up-to-date reporting requirements applying to your specific settlement.

Injured and seeking legal representation?

Call us at 901-372-5003 or email us here. We handle a wide range of personal injury cases.  Our approach to handling cases is what sets our firm apart. While some injury lawyers and firms take on hundreds of cases, and may seem more interested in quickly settling the case than seeking full and fair compensation for their client, we focus on identifying great clients and great relationships.

Victims need a lawyer with the experience, drive, and knowledge necessary to compete with the insurance companies who are handling your claim. Otherwise, you’ll end up being a victim twice, and you might not even realize it until it’s already too late. Our personal injury practice is led by Harvard-educated attorney Lang Wiseman. We know how to get fair and just results.

Click here to learn more about the work we do.

 

Property Damage by Tree Limbs and Roots

property damage by trees, property damage lawyerHave you ever wondered about property damage caused by tree limbs or roots?

First, let’s talk for a moment about your neighbor’s tree limbs.  Suppose the tree itself is on your neighbor’s property, but the limbs are hanging over your fence, casting unwanted shade or shedding leaves you don’t want to pick up.  This really bothers you. Can you trim the limbs even though the tree belongs to your neighbor and is on his property?

The quick answer is yes. But don’t ask your neighbor to pay for it. And don’t trim the limbs beyond the property line. If it’s a more serious matter, you might have a nuisance action for property damage.

Option 1: Self-Help—Trim the Branches Yourself

Under Tennessee law, you may, at your own expense, cut away intruding vegetation to the property line whether or not it constitutes a nuisance or is otherwise causing harm to your property.

Option 2: Nuisance Action—Bring Suit to Make Your Neighbor Pay Damages and Fix the Problem

In some cases, you may have a cause of action for nuisance. A nuisance lawsuit may be brought when tree branches or roots from the adjacent property encroach upon and damage your property. Lane v. W.J. Curry & Sons, 92 S.W.3d 355, 356-57 (Tenn. 2002).

What is a Nuisance?

In Tennessee, a private nuisance is anything which disturbs the free use of your property, or which renders its ordinary use or physical occupation uncomfortable. This extends to problems that endanger life or health, give offense to the senses, violate the laws of decency, or obstruct the reasonable and comfortable use of property.

Encroaching trees and plants are not nuisances just because they cast shade, drop leaves, flowers, or fruit, or just because they intrude upon your property either above or below the ground. However, the problem may be a nuisance if it causes actual harm or poses an imminent danger of actual harm to your property.

Example of a Nuisance Case

The Lane case represents a pretty extreme case of nuisance. In that case, the trees at issue caused a hole in the plaintiff’s roof and water from that hole ruined her ceilings and stove. In addition, the plaintiff had severe plumbing problems as a result of encroaching tree roots. She was not able to use her bathroom sink or tub for two years. Nor could she flush her toilet. Even worse, raw sewage bubbled up into her bathtub and the floor had to be replaced because the toilet continually backed up. The Court stated:

Clearly, the defendant’s encroaching trees have adversely affected the plaintiff’s reasonable and ordinary use and occupation of her home, not to mention posing hazards to the plaintiff’s health and safety. Accordingly, we reject the defendant’s assertion that its trees do not constitute a nuisance.

What’s the end result of a nuisance lawsuit?

The owner of the offending tree may be held responsible for harm caused and may also be required to cut back the encroaching branches or roots if a court finds that the encroaching vegetation is a nuisance.

If you are successful in a private nuisance action, you may be entitled to several types of remedies. A court might order that the nuisance be stopped (injunctive relief). You may also be entitled to money damages for the cost of restoring your property to its pre-nuisance condition, as well as damages for inconvenience, emotional distress, and injury to the use and enjoyment of your property.

Read more about tree limbs and the law in Tennessee by clicking here and reading our previous blog post titled, “Law FAQ: My Neighbor’s Tree Hangs Over the Property Line. Do I have the right to cut back the branches?” 

Need a Property Damage Lawyer?

Disputes between neighbors can be very uncomfortable. We can help, whether that means facilitating communication, fashioning an amicable resolution, or, if all else fails, filing a lawsuit. We’re here to help you find a solution that works for YOU!  Call us at 901-372-5003 or email us here if you need a property damage lawyer.

Meet the Wiseman Bray PLLC team by clicking here.

 

Who is the best lawyer near me?

best lawyer in memphis

By:  Lang Wiseman

You may have been hurt in an auto accident or truck accident and wondering:

  • Who is the best injury lawyer or best accident lawyer in Memphis, or Nashville?
  • Who is the best injury attorney near me?
  • Who is the best car wreck lawyer in Cordova, or Bartlett, or Germantown?
  • Who is the best car wreck attorney near me?

You may have been injured and Googled those questions, or perhaps others:

  • Who is the best personal injury attorney or wrongful death lawyer in Memphis?
  • Who is the best spinal cord injury lawyer, or brain injury lawyer near me, or in Memphis, or in Tennessee?
  • Who is the best lawyer to negotiate with an insurance company for damages for your injury?

Right question. Wrong answer.

You won’t ever hear any lawyer or attorney at Wiseman Bray PLLC claim that we are the “best” in Memphis – for a couple of different reasons. First, because there are plenty of fine lawyers and attorneys in the Memphis and Nashville, Tennessee area, including in Cordova, Bartlett, Germantown, Arlington, Millington, Collierville, and Lakeland.  We would seriously question any injury lawyer with the temerity to proclaim himself “the best.”

Second, based on Rule 7 of the Rules of Professional Conduct, the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility back in 2004 specifically prohibited such self-serving, subjective statements by attorneys, including statements that a lawyer is “most qualified,” “excellent,” “top,” “most experienced,” “preferred”, or an “expert” in a particular field of law, such as personal injury, auto accident, or wrongful death.  The Board’s opinion was based on provisions of Rule 7 that have since been revised, and thus it is not entirely clear whether an outright prohibition is still technically enforceable. However, most reputable lawyers still find such statements to be highly questionable, and certainly in poor taste.

So, the next time you hear an attorney refer to herself or himself as an expert, or say that he or she is the best lawyer in a Tennessee town – whether on TV or on a website or in marketing materials – you should know that that lawyer is not only humility-challenged, but also possibly in violation of the basic Rules governing attorney conduct.

The right answer?

At Wiseman Bray PLLC, you’ll only hear us talk about our experience in Memphis and Nashville, Tennessee injury claims, and about our unique and selective approach to personal injury and wrongful death claims. When it comes to injury cases, we’re not a high-volume, low-dollar settlement firm. We only take serious claims involving serious injuries or death, and we purposefully keep our caseload small so we can give our clients the attention they deserve.

You can check out our qualifications here, and you can click here to find out more about some of the actual results we’ve achieved in various types of cases, including car wrecks, truck accidents, slip and fall cases, and wrongful death claims. At the end of the day, we’ll allow our client ratings and peer reviews from such public resources as AVVO or Findlaw do the talking for us. Click on those links to see what others have to say about us.

Search our blog or  website for more helpful resources and information, and please call or email about a free consultation. We’ll respond in less than 24 hours to let you know whether we can help. Here’s our contact information.